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Geology & Earth Science: Reference Sources

A guide for doing research in geology and Earth science.

Reference Works

Subject dictionaries are a great way to familiarize yourself with words and phrases used in geology and Earth science.  Use them to find definitions and background information on your topic.

Specialized encyclopedias provide excellent introductions to many aspects of geology and Earth science.  Articles are usually written by experts in the subject, and will include a bibliography to get you started on your research.

Handbooks, Manuals, & Field Guides are useful for both work out in the field and in the lab. They are often good for finding established techniques for doing something.

Why Use Reference Works?

Reference works provide quick access to basic information about your topic.  You should select the type of reference work you want depending on the type and depth of information you need.

Dictionaries:

  • Subject dictionaries are a great way to familiarize yourself with words and phrases used in geology and Earth science.

Encyclopedias:

  • Specialized encyclopedias provide excellent introductions to many aspects of geology and Earth science.
  • Articles are usually written by experts in the subject, and will include a bibliography to get you started on your research.

Handbooks, Manuals, & Field Guides:

  • These sources are great for both work out in the field and in the lab.
  • They are often good for finding established techniques for doing something.

NOTE:  The lists below are a mix of print and electronic resources.  E-books are marked with a padlock and require a UCSBnet ID and password to access when off campus.

Valles Marineris

 

Valles Marineris

Valles Marineris is the largest canyon on Mars. It is as long as the United States and spans about 20 percent (1/5) of the entire distance around Mars.

Depth: up to 7 km (4 mi)

Length: 4000 km (2500 mi)

 

Photo Source: NASA


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