Skip to Main Content
It looks like you're using Internet Explorer 11 or older. This website works best with modern browsers such as the latest versions of Chrome, Firefox, Safari, and Edge. If you continue with this browser, you may see unexpected results.

UCSB Reads 2011: Events Calendar

Our Bodies, Our Cells: Exploring Identity

Calendar of Events

Events organized for this program and around the themes of the selected book are scheduled primarily during Winter quarter, 2011.

___________________________________

PAST EVENTS

2011

April

  • Monday, April 11 / 8:00 p.m. / UCSB Campbell Hall
    Lecture: Rebecca Skloot, author of the featured book for UCSB Reads 2011, The Immortal Life of Henrietta Lacks
    Tickets are now on sale through UCSB Arts & Lectures: General public $10.00 / all Students $5.00


     
         REBECCA SKLOOT is an award-winning author who has received wide acclaim for her work as a science and medical writer in Columbia Journalism Review; Discover;  The New York Times Magazine; O, The Oprah Magazine; and Prevention; among numerous other publications. In addition to writing, she teaches writing workshops and in creative writing programs as well as gives talks at conferences and universities.
         Skloot is the featured author of the campus-wide UCSB Reads 2011 initiative presented by the UCSB Library, the UCSB Office of the Executive Vice Chancellor, UCSB Arts & Lectures, the Santa Barbara City College Luria Library, the Santa Barbara Public Library System, Antioch University, Westmont College, and local public high schools, with generous support from many campus and community sponsors.
  • Wednesday, April 6 / 6:00 p.m. / Santa Barbara Central Public Library, Faulkner Gallery
    Community Conversations

         Join in the conversations about key topics covered in Rebecca Skloot's book, The Immortal Life of Henrietta Lacks.  This year's Reads book is the captivating story of Henrietta Lacks, an African American woman whose cancerous cells, taken without her knowledge, were cultivated and became the first "immortal" human cell line.  Over the years, these HeLa cells have made possible some of the world's most wide-reaching medical advancements.
         Please join us in a discussion with four faculty panelists who will provide context from their own research and academic interests.  All are welcome to attend the discussion, even if you haven't read the book!

         Faculty panel:
    Dr. Dawn Osborn
    Core Faculty, Antioch University

    Dr. Heather Rose
    Biology Professor, Santa Barbara City College

    Starshine Roshell
    Columnist and Journalism Professor, Santa Barbara City College

    Dr. Alice Scharper
    Dean of Educational Programs, Santa Barbara City College
         Sponsored by the UCSB Library, SBCC, Antioch University, and the Santa Barbara Public Library System
  • Tuesday, April 5 / 6:00 p.m. / Goleta Public Library
    Community Conversations

         This year's Reads book is the captivating story of Henrietta Lacks, an African American woman whose cancerous cells, taken without her knowledge, were cultivated and became the first "immortal" human cell line.  Over the years, these HeLa cells have made possible some of the world's most wide-reaching medical advancements.  Rebecca Skloot's book, The Immortal Life of Henrietta Lacks, challenges us to question our beliefs of personal identity, cell ownership, medical ethics, and poverty and racism in health care.
         Please join us in a discussion with three faculty panelists who will provide context from their own research and academic interests.  All are welcome to attend the discussion, even if you haven't read the book!

         Faculty panel:

    Dr. Kathleen Foltz
    Associate Professor, Molecular, Cellular, and Developmental Biology
    National Science Foundation Presidential Faculty Fellow

    Dr. John SW Park
    Associate Professor, Asian American Studies; affiliation with the Department of Sociology
    Assoc. Dean of Undergraduate Education

    Dr. Gabriela Soto Laveaga
    Associate Professor, History Department
         Sponsored by the UCSB Library, SBCC, Antioch University, and the Santa Barbara Public Library System


February

  • Friday, February 18 / 3:30-5:00 p.m. / Free / Room 1174, UCSB Humanities and Social Sciences Building
    "Galileo's Middle Finger: Struggles of Science and Identity Politics in the Age of the Internet"
         Alice Domurat Dreger is a specialist in bioethics and will give the second annual Lawrence Badash Lecture to explore scientific controversies regarding human identity.  Approaching her topic as a historian of science and medicine, Dreger will use several case studies to explore the nature of contemporary scientific controversies regarding human identity, and to consider how scientists and identity activists can engage more effectively in productive dialogue.
         Alice Dreger is Professor of Clinical Medical Humanities and Bioethics in the Feinberg School of Medicine at Northwestern University, and a Guggenheim Fellow. Her books include *Hermaphrodites and the Medical Invention of Sex* and *One of Us: Conjoined Twins and the Future of Normal* (both from Harvard University Press). She served as Chair of the Board of the Intersex Society of North America (ISNA) for seven years. Dr. Dreger's essays on science, medicine, and life have appeared in the New York Times, the Wall Street Journal, the Washington Post, and the Chicago Tribune. In 2009, W. W. Norton selected her essay, "Lavish Dwarf Entertainment," for inclusion in its annual Best Creative Non-Fiction volume. She has appeared on numerous broadcasts as an expert on sex, including on HBO, CNN, the Oprah Winfrey Show, and Savage Love. Dr. Dreger is a regular blogger for Psychology Today and a contributor to the Hastings Center's Bioethics Forum.
         Presented by UCSB's Center for Science and Society
  • READ on the RADIO

    Beginning on February 16th  at Noon every weekday, KCSB hosted a series of on-air readings in 30-minute excerpts from Rebecca Skloot's The Immortal Life of Henrietta Lacks 
  • February / Davidson Library, 1st floor, across from the main elevators
    Identity Tree



         As we discuss the book we are focusing on the idea of “identity.”  To illustrate this we have an interactive art project on the first floor of Davidson Library just across from the main elevators.  We invite you to come in and contribute a fingerprint “leaf” to our community tree.  After you have added a leaf, please label it with your “cell name”—the first two letters of your first name and the first two letters of your last name.
  • Tuesday, February 15 / Noon / Group Commons, 1st floor, UCSB Davidson Library
    Community Conversations


    "Perspectives on HeLa: A Cross-Disciplinary Discussion with Faculty"
         This year's UCSB Reads book is the captivating story of Henrietta Lacks, an African American woman whose cancerous cells, taken without her knowledge, were cultivated and became the first "immortal" human cell line.  Over the years, these HeLa cells have made possible some of the world's most wide-reaching medical advancements.  Rebecca Skloot's book, The Immortal Life of Henrietta Lacks, challenges us to question our beliefs of personal identity, cell ownership, medical ethics, and poverty and racism in health care.
         Please join us in a discussion with four faculty panelists who will provide context from their own research and academic interests.  The panel is one of the many community conversations taking place during this year's UCSB Reads program.  All are welcome to attend the discussion, even if you haven't read the book!

         Faculty panel:
    Dr. Ingrid Banks
    Associate Professor, Black Studies Dept.

    Dr. Mary Ann Jordan
    Research Biologist and Professor Emerita, MCDB

    Dr. W. Patrick McCray
    Professor, History Dept.

    Dr. Laury Oaks
    Associate Professor, Feminist Studies Dept.
         Sponsored by the UCSB Library 
  • Thursday, February 3 / 5:00 p.m. / MultiCultural Center Lounge
    Teens' Event:  Let's Talk About Identity!  What Makes You Who You Are?  / Cristina González
        
    Join us for a facilitated conversation and reflection on cultural identity and how to develop a feeling of belonging. When did you first become aware of your race, ethnicity, or sexual orientation? How would you describe them to others? When did you become aware of racial and ethnic identities different from your own? What have you learned about those differences and similarities? How do these identities affect your daily life? Cristina González is the Program Manager of the Fund for Santa Barbara and coordinates the Fund's Youth Making Change program. She is a Mediator and Restorative Justice Facilitator with the Conflict Solutions Center. In 2009 she became a member of the Grassroots Institute for Fundraising Training and teaches fundraising to social justice organizations.
         Co-sponsored by the Fund for Santa Barbara.
  • Wednesday, February 2 / Noon / Group Commons, 1st floor, UCSB Davidson Library
    Community Conversations

    "HeLa Cells Through a Scientific Lens: A Discussion with Faculty"
         HeLa cells were culled in 1951 from the cancerous tumor of an African American woman named Henrietta Lacks, who unknowingly provided the scientific community with what has become the most prolific and durable line of cells ever reproduced. The list of scientific and medical developments attributed to HeLa cells is staggering and continues to grow.
         This year's UCSB Reads book is "The Immortal Life of Henrietta Lacks," the fascinating, engaging story of this woman, her life and family, and her cells. Faculty here on our campus continue to work with HeLa cells. Our two panelists, both scientists in the MCDB Department, will discuss their work and their research on cells and will be available for questions.
         You’ll have a chance to view live HeLa cells through a microscope.  Please join the discussion about the social, legal, ethical, and cultural impact of human cell research in general, and of HeLa cells in particular. Everyone is welcome to attend, even if you haven't read the book!

         Faculty panel:
    Dr. Kathleen Foltz
    Associate Professor, MCDB
    National Science Foundation Presidential Faculty Fellow

    Dr. Leslie Wilson
    Professor, MCDB
    Editor of the series Methods in Cell Biology
    Associate Editor for Biochemistry
         Sponsored by the UCSB Library

 

January

  • Friday, January 21 / 7:30 p.m. / Corwin Pavilion / Free Public Lecture / RSVP by January 14

    How Chromosome Ends Affect Cancer and Age-related Disease  /
    Carol W. Greider, Ph.D., Nobel Laureate
         Many of the transforming discoveries in cancer research will occur during this century. To support pioneering research, the Cancer Center of Santa Barbara, the Doreen J. Putrah Cancer Research Foundation and UC Santa Barbara have partnered to bring the nation’s thought leaders on understanding and treating cancer to Santa Barbara. We invite you to listen to seminal works in cancer research and to meet the people who have had a key impact in cancer research and treatment.
         Carol W. Greider, Ph.D. is the Daniel Nathans Professor and the Director of Molecular Biology and Genetics at the Johns Hopkins Institute of Basic Biomedical Sciences at Johns Hopkins University. Carol Greider, a graduate of the University of California, Santa Barbara, was awarded the 2009 Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine. Greider shared the Nobel Prize with Elizabeth Blackburn and Jack Szostak. The three were honored for the discovery of “how chromosomes are protected by telomeres and the enzyme telomerase”, an enzyme that maintains the length and integrity of chromosome ends and is critical for the health and survival of all living cells and organisms. This is a key mechanism in the genetic operations of cells, an insight that has inspired new lines of research into cancer.
         Professor Greider graduated from UCSB in 1983 with a bachelor’s degree in biology from the College of Creative Studies, and earned her Ph.D. in molecular biology in 1987 from the University of California, Berkeley, where Blackburn was her supervisor. Professor Greider is currently a professor of molecular biology and genetics at Johns Hopkins University, where she has been since 1997.
  • Tuesday, January 18 / 3-5:00 p.m. / Student Resources Building, Multipurpose Room
    Student Life Presents: Your Identity Matters
         Come join us as we take an interactive, yet informative approach in exploring the topic of identity. Our goal is to emphasize how we have differences, but it is also important for us to look at our similarities. We need to embrace them, instead of using our differences to promote discrimination.
         This event will consist of 2 activities that will allow participants to reflect on the different components of their unique identities. Everyone will also have the opportunity to learn from others and open their minds to other identities.
         If students have any questions about the identities or categories discussed, they can ask representatives from various departments and groups. There will be free food and prizes!!!
  • Thursday, January 6 / NOON / Davidson Library, Main Lobby
    Free copies of The Immortal Life of Henrietta Lacks to UCSB students

         2,000 free copies of the featured book for "UCSB Reads," The Immortal Life of Henrietta Lacks, will be distributed to UCSB students beginning on Thursday, January 6, at Noon in the main lobby of the Davidson Library, while supplies last.
  • January / Davidson Library, 1st floor, across from the main elevators
    Identity Tree
         As we discuss the book we are focusing on the idea of “identity.”  To illustrate this we have an interactive art project on the first floor of Davidson Library just across from the main elevators.  We invite you to come in and contribute a fingerprint “leaf” to our community tree.  After you have added a leaf, please label it with your “cell name”—the first two letters of your first name and the first two letters of your last name.

 

 


Copyright © 2008-2019 The Regents of the University of California, All Rights Reserved.
UCSB Library (805) 893-2478 • Music Library (805) 893-2641 • UCSB, Santa Barbara, CA 93106-9010
Contact UsPolicies